Posts Tagged With: BPA

What Matters Most?

Since we are getting close to the new year, I’m planning my future research and product reviews and wanted to pose to the people: What matters most to you?

I’ve listed the top-ten most common things that crop up as questions regarding the healthful qualities of a better-for-you product.

Please let me know what matters to you and I’ll put those things highest on my list to delve into this coming year.

And thanks in advance for playing along!

The Southern Girl

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10 Ways You Can Go Green, Too!

If you don’t want to be green because you think it is too hard, and you’ll have to give up too many things you don’t WANT to give up, remember it doesn’t have to be all or nothing.  Make the changes that you feel like you can, and when you feel like you are ready to take the next step, take it.  I promise the sense of accomplishment you’ll have will make you feel like doing more.  And knowing that you are becoming part of the solution in a variety of efforts (improving your own life, your environment, preventing future health issues in your life and maybe your kids’ lives, maybe your parents’ and friends lives, maybe even your pets), is its own reward.

A warning, though:  No one likes a scolder or a nag, even if you mean well (I apologize to my work friends who have taught me this lesson).  But try leading by example, or pointing your friends to this blog or others like it so they can decide for themselves or at least start asking questions about the way we live and why so many products on our shelves and in our houses are not good for us or the planet.

1.  Recycle.  This seems obvious, but if you don’t have curbside recycling (like I don’t) or if you live in an apartment, it takes much more effort to do.  If you get some dedicated bins, it might help you start thinking about where your trash is going…to a landfill? or to a place that it can be used again?  If we are talking about aluminum, you can get money back.  If you take that money to buy some replacement earth-friendly products, it technically pays for itself.  Glass is one product that is not only the safest to consume products from, it is one of the most efficiently recycled.  Texas doesn’t have a program anymore to pay bottle “deposit” returns, but some states pay 5 – 10 cents per bottle recycled…you could really clean up, literally (pun intended).

2.  Only buy plastic products with 1, 2, or 5 recyling numbers on them.  These plastics are least likely to leach chemicals into your food and they are also the most often recyled products.  Still, do not heat up anything in plastic, but you can use it for cold storage and transportation (like refilling a water bottle to use again).   Better yet, try buying some glass storage containers for your food/drink.

3.  Filter your water.  This can be as easy as buying a Brita pitcher or putting a filter directly on your tap and/or shower head.  There are a lot of chemicals used to treat municipal drinking water, and while this is obviously a good thing to keep us from catching diseases, we really don’t need (or want) to be putting these chemicals into our body on a daily basis.  A filter can cut down on heavy metals that may leach from pipes, as well.  It also achieves the simple result of making your water taste/smell better so that maybe you’ll drink more of it instead of buying bottles of water that have to be recycled or something like soda or sweet drinks we don’t really need.  And if you make tea/coffee/soup with this filtered water, I promise it will all taste (and be) so much better.

4.  Change one or two of your products.  So, some of my friends have gone into a panicky “I CAN’T GIVE THIS UP” reaction to some of the products I’ve outed as not so good for us.  So, if you love your shampoo, by all means, please keep using your shampoo.  But maybe try a different body wash (or lotion or perfume) that is free of negative chemicals.  You don’t have to go through a big purge like I did, but just try a few different things.  If you like them, yay! Keep using them!  If you don’t, keep trying!  I promise you will find things you like.  If you HAVE to wear your signature perfume, and you think it has phthalates in it, just compensate by trying to use other phthalate-free products.  Remember that (especially with hair and skin products) your body is going to have to adjust to new products.  Give it a good college try for two weeks.  If it just isn’t working for you, please go back to the tried and true.  You can always be green in other ways 😉

5.  Turn off and un-plug.  How many electronics do you leave plugged in all the time that you do not use on a daily basis?  Your toaster?  Your blender?  A stereo with lots of components?  Your hairdryer?  Your phone charger?  Now, obviously, we leave some things plugged in because we don’t want to crawl back behind a big piece of furniture to unplug them.  Why care about unplugging stuff?  Even if you aren’t actively using it, a plugged in appliance draws electricity that is often referred to as “standby” or “vampire” electicity use.  If you’ve had to live through “rolling blackouts” because the demand for energy surpassed that of the electrical grid, this is one of the reasons to unplug.  But what is worse, most of us get power from combustion-based power plants that use coal or natural gas.  Both of these types of combustion produce green-house gasses, but also take a significant toll on the environment to get and transport.  So, unplug appliances and your cell phone chargers when you aren’t using them.  For things like stereos, think about getting a “smart” power strip that shuts down unused electronics via its own monitoring sensors.  This will also cut down on your electricity bill.

6.  Buy organic.  Buy local.  Eating organic food eliminates a large number of toxins from pesticides, antibiotics, and hormones that we don’t need or want in our bodies.  Most grocery stores have organic options these days, but they tend to cost significantly more than non-organic varieties of the same product (and sometimes look uglier).   Don’t worry about the little blemishes or lack of shine on some of your fruits and vegetables…this means they haven’t been artificially dyed or coated with things to keep them artificially perfect.  A spot won’t hurt you.  You can often find organic products at local farmers markets for better prices and you (usually) also get local products there.  Local products reduce the impact of transportation and ensure that things are much fresher, and therefore much better for you.  Again, you don’t have to go whole hog all at once, just make changes as you can.

7.  Change your lightbulbs.  I know it’s a pain to go through the house changing out those old incandescent lightbulbs, but I promise it is worth the money and energy savings to get compact fluorescent bulbs or similar new, energy-efficient bulbs.  Not only do they save significant energy in consumption, but they are cooler (making your AC work more efficiently) and last much longer.  I have some that I think are 5-years old already and work just like the day I bought them.  Not like those annoying incandescents that seem to burn out every six months.

8.  Compost, if you can.  For apartment dwellers, this is a little harder, but not really.  Compost is basically throwing out your plant-based food scraps and yard cuttings/leaves into a dedicated location that will allow it to naturally break down into mulch.  If you live in an apartment, you can get a compost bucket, and either find a “natural setting” to dump it, or think about getting together with some neighbors to ask the apartment complex to designate a spot for a compost pile.  Avoid putting meat and droppings from dogs/cats in your compost pile, but egg shells are okay.  I have a big flower pot next to my back door that I dump this stuff into…I think it is 50% coffee grounds, and with natural filter paper, it all breaks down into stuff that is good for your flowerbeds.  This is nature’s recycling, and obviously it keeps this stuff out of the landfills.

9.  Be old-fashioned.  Now this one is broad in its potential, but I feel like half of the “improvements” we’ve come up with in our lives are not improvements but wasteful.  My grandmother (who was my babysitter when I was a child) grew up in the Great Depression,and she was the mother of 6.  She did not waste a thing.  She cooked in uncoated pans, made coffee in a percolator, and saved and ate all the left-overs until they were gone.  There were only paper bags from the grocery store when I was a kid, and these became trash bags.  She used rags to clean the kitchen and bathroom, not papertowels or other one-use throw-aways.  She hung clothes and sheets out on a clothesline to dry when she could.  She patched and mended clothes when they got  a little worn, and when they were worn beyond use or fashion, she cut them into scraps for other things like quilts or altered them into something else.  It doesn’t take a lot of ingenuity, it just takes thinking, “how did we do this before?”  What am I wasting?  You’ll also find yourself saving money.

10.  Start asking why.  If you are as befuddled about some of our products as I am, start contacting the customer service departments of these companies via e-mail or toll free phone numbers and ask why products aren’t recycleable (like K-cups),  if their products contain BPA and/or phthalates and why, if they do.  Ask about other toxic ingredients.  Ask about their sustainability practices and what they are doing to protect the environment.  If enough people start asking, they WILL listen.  Especially if you stop using toxic products.  Companies will feel it in their finances, which is really the best way to communicate to a big company.  I can’t do it alone, but if everyone starts asking, more people will know and eventually changes will begin.

I don’t want to preach to anyone, but if we want this planet to last for future generations, we have to start taking care of it.  And if we look at how the chemicals are impacting us, you can imagine what is happening to other creatures on this planet that have no choice in the matter.  It doesn’t have to be a complete lifestyle overhaul (but it can be, if you want to)–little changes do add up.  Just start.  You’ll be happy that you did.

Categories: being green, recycling | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Just so you know…

At least in the United States, “There is not a safety standard in place that requires any testing to be done whatsoever in any cosmetic product,” said toxicologist Timothy Kropp, a senior scientist with the Washington-based Environmental Working Group.

from Wash that MIT Out of Your Hair?  Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Jennifer Bails, December 6, 2004

Categories: endocrine disruptors | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Coming Clean

I recently got struck by a lightning bolt of knowledge when I watched “Bag It,” a documentary by Jeb Berrier.  I mean, I know plastic is not the best thing in the world, as most of us do.  Yes, we should recycle, but do we?  There was that whole discussion/uproar about BPA (Bisphenol A) in baby products a few years back.  And yes, of course, we know plastic persists in the environment and that it’s bad for all kinds of animals, especially marine animals who end up consuming it.  But for some reason, I’d never heard about phthalates

Now phthalates, it turns out, are not just found in plastics.  This is a class of chemicals that is used in all kinds of products.  Parents should be concerned because “squishy” plastics can consist of more phthalate than the actual plastic…they could be BPA-free but still dense with phthalate that can be easily transferred to the human body, especially when it (as kids are known to do) is put in the mouth.  In Jeb’s movie, a rubber ducky is equated to a “phthalate lollipop.” 

Even if you avoid plastics containing phthalates, however, you are probably still exposed to them.  They are commonly used in fragrances as a solubilizer and stabilizer.  Any product with a fragrance may contain phthalates without disclosing them on the label because, as it turns out, fragrances are considered to be trade secrets, and this includes the chemicals used to create the fragrance (like ingredients that solubilize and stabilize).  This is especially alarming for me since I am a perfume hound…I have 18 different kinds of perfume and 15 different kinds of body spray (I know! I have a problem!).

Additionally, here is a list of the other most common places you can find phthalates:

Coatings on pharmaceutical pills and nutritional supplements, adhesives and glues, electronics, agricultural applications, building materials, personal-care products, medical devices, detergents, packaging, toys, modelling clay, waxes, paints, printing inks, food, and fabrics.

Why, you may be asking, do we need to avoid these two chemicals, BPA and phthalate, specifically?  They are both considered to be endocrine disruptors and can affect the body in numerous ways that can include birth defects, disruption of thyroid function, increased incidents of cancer, abnormal obesity, insulin resistance, asthma, potential links to attention deficit disorders and autism, and more.  Anyone notice how there have been increased rates of obesity and autism?

It seems easier to avoid BPA…plastics labeled 1, 2, 5 and 6 are free of BPA (or should be).  Don’t eat or drink anything out of other plastics.  Ideally, you should drink out of glass/ceramics when you can, and try to avoid cooking anything in the microwave even in these plastics.

Phthalates, however, are everywhere.  It’s easy to get paranoid about it.  I have.  I am trying to combat this sense of paranoia, though, by purging offensive items from my house, and replacing them with more natural and hopefully more organic items.  I can’t really do anything about the paint on the walls and the floor coverings, except, I suppose to wear shoes in the house (wait, do my shoes have phthalates in them?).  

As the days and weeks progress, I will be snitching on offensive products and offering up better products.  It is an expensive undertaking, unfortunately to buy the better products, but if you do it bit by bit, you can start to make a dent.

Today’s cheap find:  Bon Ami powder cleanser…to scrub the countertops and the bathtub/shower.  Five ingredients! Limestone, feldspar, biodegradable cleaning agents (from coconut/corn – I suspect this is a powdered soap from the oil of these plants), soda ash, and baking soda. $1.69 at the fancy natural grocery store.

The most expensive thing I bought today:  Pacifica brand body butter in Mediterranean Fig scent.  It is free of animal products (this company does not test on animals either), parabens, phthalates, propylene glycol, mineral and peanut oils, and artificial color.  This cost $16.99 at a different, fancier grocery store.  If you go to Pacifica’s website, they clearly indicate that their skin care is free of these things, but they do NOT clearly indicate that their fragrances (perfume spray/solids) are phthalate free.  Which seems a bit suspicious to me.  I have e-mailed their customer service to find out the “word” regarding this suspicion, and I will dutifully report back with any response I receive.  In the meantime, this fragrant lotion will be one of my “perfume replacers.”

The other e-mail I sent today was to Kuumba Made.  These perfume oils are commonly found in the fancy grocery stores for not too much money (about $8) and they smell pretty (I especially like Egyptian Musk).  They claim to be natural, but there is almost no information about ingredients.  I have asked if there are phthalates in their products, so we shall see what they say.

In the future, I’ll probably also reveal other terrible chemicals we’d all be better off avoiding.  And possibly I’ll start petitions and “writing” campaigns to get the mainstream manufacturers to start cutting the crap out of their products to make this place healthier for all.  United we stand, people.

Finally, my Environmental Protection degree is coming in handy!

Categories: endocrine disruptors, phthalates, plastic | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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