Posts Tagged With: natural

Ah, Summer!

Oh my gosh!  Where did the time go?  I can’t believe I have been so behind in my posts.  I started a new job and have been trying to eat healthier/live healthier, and this has sucked away much of the free time I used to dedicate to writing.  Well, I’m carving out time for writing again, so I will promise updates.

Here is what you can expect:  revisiting toothpaste, deodorant, and shampoo.  Since it is nearly summer for many of you (it has been summer-like in Austin since April), it’s time to think about sunscreens and chlorine.  I will also put preservatives and colorants on my schedule, in addition to other household items like cooking pans, microwaves, laundry detergent, how to replace plastic in your life, and last, but not least…more recipes!  I make my own soap and occasionally my own laundry detergent, so I will share some of the tricks I have learned over the years.  I might even start selling some of these products on www.etsy.com.  That’s going to take some gumption, though…

I also hope to open some discussions for debate regarding natural products or homemade solutions to those pesky “how did we used to do this before plastic?” questions.  If you have suggestions or questions, I’ll do my best to find some answers from somewhere.

As for me, I’m off to the farmer’s market.  Hooray!

Categories: being green | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Post Christmas Splurge!

So, I couldn’t resist…I bought some more shampoo, hairspray, and toothpaste.  They were all on sale!

First, Everyday Shea Shampoo in Vanilla Mint.

Vanilla Mint Everyday Shea Shampoo

This came in a gigantic size (32 oz.) for $13.99 (about $0.44/oz).  I’ll use it for body/hand soap, too, to justify the cost.  The mint (spearmint), in my opinion, overpowers the vanilla, but it’s still lovely and makes me feel all happy.  It produces a nice lather and doesn’t leave hair feeling…shall I say… TOO clean?   If you’ve ever washed your hair with Dr. Bronner’s you know what I’m talking about.  It’s not like that at all.

Shea butter and oil, as well as coconut oil, are the saponified fats in this product, so it should be quite moisturizing.  I’ve only used it for a few days, but so far, my hair seems manageable and not greasy and not crunchy.  So far so good.   The company uses fair trade ingredients, no synthetic fragrances, no parabens, and does not test on animals.  The fragrances are created with essential oils (and they have unscented versions of their products, too).  This means no phthalates!

Now, I would be remiss if I didn’t discuss an ingredient: cocamidapropyl betaine.  This is a surfactant that is synthetically made by chemically manipulating coconut oil and it can be an allergen to some people.  If you know you have skin reactions to surfactants, you may want to avoid this product.  If I notice anything strange, I’ll report back.

Second, Giovanni L.A. Hold Hair Spritz!

Giovanni L.A. Hold Hair Spritz

Okay, so I delayed getting hairspray after my purge, thinking I didn’t “really” need it and most brands cost about $10/bottle.  Unfortunately, this meant I couldn’t wear my hair up, because I can’t stand the falling-down fly-aways that happen without hairspray.  And, honestly, I’m one of those people who like my hair to be neat and without the hairspray, all of those little pieces that wouldn’t lay flat after midmorning drove me nutso.

THIS hairspray to the rescue!  Giovanni products are vegan with a few exceptions of beeswax in their lip balms and milk in some of their products.  They do not test on animals, they do not put phthalates in their products, most fragrances are created naturally from essential oils and plant extracts, and many of their ingredients are certified organic.

This hairspray smells slightly floral, and holds lightly all day without being stiff (although this is touted as “maximum hold,” I don’t think it can be compared to the hard/crispy hairsprays we remember from high school).  At least the hairspray holds enough that I don’t have to fuss with my hair in the  mirror at work with those crazy fly-aways.  I haven’t tested the up-do hold, yet, but I’ll do more homework and get back to you on this.  It also hasn’t had to stand up to any crazy humidity yet.  I’m happy with it so far, so I hope it works for the occasional bun or ponytail.  It cost $7.95 for 5 oz…which will probably last about 4 months for me.  Not bad. And yes, ANOTHER toothpaste:  Now XyliWhite Cinnafresh Toothpaste Gel.

I have decided for my own health concerns to avoid fluoride.  This toothpaste doesn’t have any fluoride, but it does have xylitol, which works to prevent cavities by killing bacteria.  It also contains papain (a fruit enzyme) for whitening effect.  The paste itself is very much like gel, but it has the same color as beeswax, which I suppose could be a bit off-putting at first, but at least it’s not full of fake food dyes.  Here are the other ingredients: water, hydrated silica, glycerin, sorbitol, sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, sodium coco-sulfate, carrageenan (Chondrus crispus), cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) leaf oil, tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) leaf oil, potassium sorbate.   Keep this FAR away from dogs, because the high quantity of xylitol could be fatally toxic (this is true for anything containing xylitol, obviously).  I like the cinnamon flavor, but it certainly isn’t as powerful as Jason’s Powersmile pepperminty-blast of fresh.  It does foam up nicely even though it doesn’t have any SLSes, and the slick-clean sensation is about a 9/10 for me.  I feel like my teeth keep that quality longer than with regular toothpaste…like it’s 11 pm now (I brushed my teeth around 8:30 am), and there’s no noticeable plaque-y feel on my teeth like there normally would be.  I find this amazing!  It  cost about $4.39 for a big 6.4 oz tube.  On www.iherb.com, you can get other flavors, and it is on sale for $3.81 right now.  It’s a definite thumbs up, and I am happy to feel un-conned on fluoride with this one. AND…although I haven’t tried any of their products, the Yes To Inc. company that creates Yes to Carrots and Yes to Cucumbers (and other vegetables)…have passed the no phthalate test!  They have a wholly organic line of baby products, which of course are good for adults to use, too.  They also avoid the use of parabens and SLSes.  They try to use as many organic and non-synthetic ingredients as possible, so just read the labels to see if there might be anything objectionable in it.  They do not test on animals and most products are also vegan…those that aren’t contain only beeswax and honey.  This is another brand that is widely available at WalMart and drugstores, but you might find a better selection at a “natural” store.  You can also shop at their online store, of course.  So, huzzah for finding another good and easy to find natural brand.  Options are awesome and variety is the spice of life!  Next time…the deodorant test continues.  Spoiler Alert!  I am breaking up with Tom’s of Maine forever!

Categories: hair products, toothpaste, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Natural Toothpaste Taste Test (and research)

So, hey, everyone…I know you are dying to hear about TOOTHPASTE!  That’s right toothpaste is on the board today, and I have spent about two weeks testing 3 different brands.  First, though, a little lesson about toothpaste (okay, it’s kind of a big lesson, but bear with me).

I think it is safe to say that the things we want toothpaste to do are:  clean the tooth surface, prevent cavities, bad breath, and gingivitis, and whiten the tooth surface (or at least reduce the staining that can happen with food, drink, smoking, and age). 

Cleaning and whitening are usually accomplished with detergents and abrasives. 

The most common detergents in toothpaste are sodium lauryl sulfate or sodium laureth sulfate, and no doubt, if you are reading my blog you may already have seen it listed as things that companies are removing from their products.  Why are these bad, you may wonder?  Why the heck are they in everything from shampoo to…toothpaste?  Well, as a surfactant, it makes things slippery and disassociate from surfaces (helps get things unstuck) and it also emulsifies, keeping things in solution (those unstuck particles stay unstuck).  This is ideal for cutting through grease, dirt, and for your teeth…plaque and bacteria.  Not a bad thing.  For hair, these surfactants can be too strong, stripping hair, and leaving it feeling like straw.  They’ve been officially labeled as “human irritants,” with the “laureth” version being much more irritating than the “lauryl” variety.   If you want to avoid these, it’s not hard to do these days…do as you like, but I wouldn’t call them “toxic” or “dangerous,” just irritating.  If you are prone to “canker” sores or “gum boils” (as my grandmother called them), it may be the SLSes to blame.

Abrasives can be any variety of particles meant to polish your teeth with the physical action of scrubbing.  These should be mild, obviously, to prevent damaging your tooth enamel.  Common abrasives are aluminum hydroxide, calcium carbonate, calcium hydrogen phosphates, silica, mica, zeolites, and hyrdoxyapatite.  Based on my research, the only one you should try to avoid is aluminum hydroxide for its suspected toxicity.  Most whitening-action toothpaste, as it turns out, whitens more than regular paste due to “more polishing” and therefore more abrasiveness.   Be mindful of these varieties as they may end up doing more harm than good in the long run. 

If you want a quick listing of abrasive ratings for common toothpastes (it even includes some Tom’s, straight baking soda, and some brands, like CloSYS, that come in fluoride-free versions) check out this link:  http://dukeslc.wordpress.com/2008/11/20/toothpaste-abrasion-ratings/

Prevention of cavities

This is probably the most controversial topic I’ve written about yet, because if you start looking, you will find whole websites dedicated to the vilification of fluoride, while others (like most of us have been taught) promote fluoride as THE ingredient that prevents cavities.  There are so many studies about this, and so many things that people claim are fact without any references, so I don’t want to promote a culture of reactionary assumption.  Honestly, you are going to have to decide for yourself on this one, but I’ll summarize my findings.

First, let me explain that there are three different versions of fluoride used in toothpastes:  sodium fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate, and stannous fluoride (which is actually a naturally-occurring salt).  My research has turned up evidence that only one version of fluoride actually helps harden teeth and this is stannous fluoride.  The only toothpaste brand using this version of fluoride today is Crest Pro-Health.  There are also “fluoride treatment gels”  like Gel-Kam, OMNI Gel, and Flo-Gel  that use stannous fluoride, but these aren’t intended for daily use and aren’t “toothpastes.”    If you leave stannous fluoride on your teeth too long, it can discolor your teeth (but usually it’s not permanent), which may be why most companies don’t use it.  Usually the discoloration is as white flecks (not that bad), or a golden brown (pretty bad).   I could get into other chemical reactions, but let’s not.

The research I am citing is from the American Journal of Dentistry, August 2011; 24(4) 205-10, from an article called: Enamel Protection: a comparison of marketed dentrifice performance against dental erosion.  Note: dentrifice is just a fancy word for “toothpaste.”  The authors, Faller, Eversole, and Tzeghai, compared our three previously mentioned forms of fluoride on actual cores of human teeth and with human saliva (okay, kind of gross, but at least it is realistic).  The results were that stannous fluoride protected enamel the best against citric acid and phosphoric acid (common acids we consume in food and drink), while sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate were not significantly different than the control nor each other.  So, long story short, if you want to use fluoride, you should go with the stannous fluoride.  That’s Crest Pro Health.  Have at it.  It gets a 3/10 from EWG’s database.

NOW, why might you want to avoid fluoride altogether?  A summary of reasons goes like this:

  1. Fluoride accumulates in the body.
  2. Some people are more sensitive to fluoride than others, and this usually applies to children…the impact goes beyond tooth enamel discoloration, as described below

(Specific to fluoride in your water, but also applicable to fluoride’s impact on the body)

  1. There has never been a single randomized clinical trial to demonstrate fluoridation’s effectiveness or safety.
  2. Fluoridation’s role in the decline of tooth decay is in serious doubt.
  3. Fluoride may damage the brain, lower IQ, and may cause non-IQ neurotoxic effects.
  4. Fluoride affects the pineal gland, thyroid function, causes arthritis symptoms, and damages bone.
  5. Fluoride may increase hip fractures in the elderly.
  6. Fluoride may cause bone cancer.
  7. Fluoride may cause reproductive problems.
  8. The chemicals used to fluoridate water are not pharmaceutical grade, but are usually the byproduct of the phosphate fertilizer industry and may be contaminated with a variety of other impurities that may include substances like arsenic.
  9. Many scientists oppose fluoridation.  As of July 2011, over 3700 professionals have signed a statement calling for an end to water fluoridation worldwide (this statement and a list of signatories can be found on the website of the Fluoride Action Network (see: www.FluorideAlert.org)).

So, like I said at the beginning of this section, there is so much research you can go hunting for yourself and make your own decisions.  Another site you might want to check out is www.fluoridation.com

Other things you may find in your toothpaste

Xylitol – you probably recognize this from some sugar-free gums and candies, but it works to prevent bacterial growth and therefore prevents cavities and gingivitis; it also makes your toothpaste sweet and comes from natural sources.

Stevia extract – a not so new to natural-living proponets, but new to most of us mainstream people, this is a  natural non-caloric sweetener. 

Saccharine – less natural, used for zero-calorie sweeting, associated with cancer in rats, but is generally accepted as safe in small quantities…this is the sweetener in Sweet-n-Low.  It only gets a 2/10 toxicity rating.

Essential oils and plant extracts – in some natural toothpastes, this is another bacteria-fighting and additional cleaning ingredient.

I would obviously read other things on the ingredient lists of the toothpastes you use and avoid those things that are otherwise harmful.  The EWG Skin Deep database does contain a large number of toothpastes, so you can check out their toxicity ratings per ingredient.

NOW, lesson over.  Sheesh, I apologize.  On to the taste tests!

Toothpaste #1:  Tom’s of Maine Whole Care with fluoride in Spearmint flavor.  The fluoride is in sodium monofluorophosphate variety.  The other ingredients are glycerin, water, calcium carbonate, hydrated silica, xylitol, carrageenan, spearmint leaf oil and other natural flavors, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), and zinc citrate.  It’s not animal tested, and Tom’s is committed to sustainable practices, recycling, being as natural as possible, and giving back to the community.   So, it was not too gritty, and seemed adequately paste-y in a way that sort of reminds me of my childhood Colgate.   It foams up like a “regular” paste and has the same level of refreshing minty-ness.  It seems like the clean-lasting factor is about 3 or so hours, which is decent.  Basically, this is your average paste with average results with natural ingredients.  I give it 3 out of 5 stars.

Toothpaste #2:  Burt’s Bees Natural Toothpaste:  Multicare with Fluoride in Peppermint flavor.  The fluoride here is also sodium monofluorophosphate.  The other ingredients are glycerin, hydrated silica, xylitol, calcium sodium phosphosilicate, sodium cocoyl  glutamate, titanium dioxide, cranberry fruit powder, stevia extract, carrageenan, xanthan gum, silica, natural flavor, lecithin, and maltodextrin.  So, this is free of SLSes, and you can tell since it is less foamy.  The paste is noticeably grittier than average, and it looks slightly off-white and speckled from the cranberry fruit powder.  The peppermint flavor is refreshing but doesn’t last.  If you don’t get enough paste on your brush, it does seem to “go away.”  When you DO get enough on your brush, the clean-feel lasts longer than Tom’s, which may imply more abrasiveness.   I’ve already chatted up Burt’s Bees in other posts, so I’ll refrain now.  And I also noticed a saltiness that isn’t extreme in any way, but noticeable.  I would give this one 2.5 stars.

Awesome stuff!

 
 
 

Toothpaste #3:  Jason Powersmile All Natural Whitening Toothpaste in Peppermint flavor.  There no fluoride in this toothpaste and I’m going to count that as a good thing.  The other ingredients are calcium carbonate, purified water, vegetable glycerin, sodium cocoyl glutamate, peppermint oil, carrageenan, aloe vera leaf gel, bamboo stem powder, parsley extract, perilla seed extract, baking soda, silica, stevioside, grapefruit seed extract.  I’m just going to come right out and say it.  I love this toothpaste!  It is strong on the peppermint side, so maybe that makes me “feel” like it is cleaning better?  Very refreshing and lasting in flavor (think Altoids), as well as in that clean feel.  And I’m not joking.  On days when I used this paste, in the afternoon, I was still thinking, “wow, my teeth feel clean.”  Again, this may be due to increased amounts of abrasives, but it may also be due to the increased amount of plant extracts that act as anti-bacterial factors.  The paste color is a little tiny bit on the gray side and less paste-y in texture…more like a white gel, which I guess is the aloe.  I’m giving this one a 4.5 out of 5.

Now, interestingly, as I was doing all of this research I found this:  “Most of the cleaning is achieved by the mechanical action of the toothbrush, and not by the toothpaste. Salt and Baking soda are among materials that can be substituted for commercial toothpaste.”  So, you know me, I went and brushed my teeth with the magical baking soda.  It seems to foam up on its own…this is the reaction of the basic pH of the baking soda with the acidic pH of the saliva.  From an abrasive point of view it is mild, and it seems my brush alone would do a fairly decent job, and without the zing of peppermint or cinnamon, I’m left feeling just…salty.  And it’s not very pleasant.  And it’s drippy…like you can’t walk around the house brushing your teeth this way…at least I couldn’t.  I would use baking soda if I ran out of Jason’s, but I’d prefer something like paste.  1 out 5 stars.  Sorry baking soda.

Categories: toothpaste, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reporting Back, Finally!

Found this bag by Credo Bags today...love!

 

I have updates! 

I was asked to contact Aveda and Philosophy specifically by friends and I contacted each company and finally received responses from each company.

First, Aveda. 

Verbatim from their e-mail response:  “Aveda’s plant-based mission and principles, on which the company was founded, have always steered us toward using plant-based or plant-derived ingredients whenever possible.  In keeping with this mission, Aveda products are developed using pure flower and plant essences and are phthalate-free. Aveda does not use phthalates in its formulations.”  So, this is good to know, however, I have learned to go ahead and take a look at the other ingredients to make sure that nothing is listed there that might be harmful in a different way. 
 
Secondly, Philosophy.  Also, verbatim from their e-mail: “thank you for contacting philosophy! we do have many different products that are phthalate free. please reply to this email with any specific products you are interested in and we would be happy to verify if they are phthalate free.”  Yes, the e-mail contained no capitalized letters.  Weird. 

Anyway, this is more of a “skirting the issue” response to me, because while Philosophy does have some phthalate-free products, they are not committed to using natural products, and so, don’t.  This means that phthalate-free products may have different harmful chemicals in them.  I confess to completely crushing my sister-in-law’s favorite lip gloss from Philosophy by letting her know that it contained three different ingredients that are considered to be carcinogenic, bio-accumulating, and/or endocrine disrupting.  Whoops.  So, I am debating crafting a doozy of an e-mail in response, listing every Philosophy product I can find, also asking pointed questions about the oxybenzone, octinoxate, and benzyl benzoate they put in their lip gloss. 

Thirdly, Thymes.  This is a fancier-than-usual product line that they sell in my fancy grocery store, but you can also find them in gift shops and on-line.  I wanted to buy my mom some of their candles/soaps, but decided to see if they were “okay.”  Their response, also verbatim, was:  “Thank you for your reply. No, we no longer use SLS/SLES, propylene glycol, DEA, TEA, formaldehyde donors, or phthalates in our products. I hope this is helpful and if you have any further questions, please let me know. Thank you!”  Similar to my Aveda research, it would be wise to check out the other ingredients they use to make sure they are “good enough.”

So, if you want to hunt down info about specific chemicals, you can either read up on wiki or head over to EWG’s Skin Deep database.  They have a big databank of products that they grade based upon ingredients.  There are a couple of caveats with the EWG database, though…some of their listings are outdated and therefore do not necessarily have the current product formula in the database.  They also score heavily for potentially harmful side-effects that don’t necessarily affect people in the same way.  For instance, I am not allergic to fragrances.  Anything with an undisclosed fragrance (possibly because fragrances can contain anything from phthalates to synthetic fragrances that do not occur naturally) gets a high score of 8/10.  Hence my research that entails actually contacting the companies and asking for clarification.  However, if you want info about a particular chemical, it’s a good source. 
 
And my own review of the ridiculously cheap, homemade baking-soda-based deodorant spray that I wrote about last time:  Day 1, I wore a wool sweater over a long-sleeved tee and jeans, the temperature high for the day was 50 degrees, and I did not do much in the way of exercise. Day 2, I wore a loose jacket over a t-shirt with a scarf (and jeans again), the weather was a little warmer, and I matched the same level of effort for the day.  I am not a sweaty person, usually, so I’m not really concerned about wetness, but on the funk-level, I am more concerned.  In all honesty, I have to say that at the end of each day, there was surprisingly *almost* no stink.  I think this works better than Tom’s for me.  And when I say almost, that means, there wasn’t zero odor, but I’d say it was at about 97% funk-free even the next day. 
 
Day 3-4 were spent on the weekend doing not much.  Then came Monday, which was, notably, the first day I wore synthetic fabrics.  And this was the first day of funk.  I thought maybe I had not applied enough.  So, of course, like the good little researcher I am, I made sure I put enough on the next day, and wore another outfit of synthetic fabric.  Same result.  I switched back to cotton, and voila, no stink!  And then, I did go to the gym.  And I did sweat.  But I did not stink.  So all those health classes touting natural fabrics to allow the body to breathe weren’t lying!   Natural fabrics allow any moisture to wick away.  Synthetic fabrics?…not so much, therefore encouraging funk-causing bacteria to grow.   So, at least for me, I will continue to use the non-aluminum, baking soda and water “deodorant” on those days when I wear natural fibers, and someday, when I splurge on the La Vanila stuff, I’ll use that when I wear the synthetics.  In the meantime, though, I have stumbled upon a reason to buy more natural-fiber clothes.  Oh, dang.
 
 P.S.  The only drawback to the baking soda and water formula is that the spray pump seems easily clogged by the baking soda in the solution, so I now I just “splash” it on.  Maybe less baking soda or more water will reduce that problem? Next batch I’ll tinker with the amounts.  But, definitely a thumbs up.    Try it!
Categories: deodorant, endocrine disruptors, phthalates, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

To Sweat or Not to Sweat? That is the question.

I have promised to write about a subject that is near and dear to my heart…sweating. And not so much the sweating part as the stinking part that usually happens along with sweating.  Because, when you do ask the question, to sweat or not to sweat?…the answer is obviously to sweat, because humans eliminate toxins from their bodies via the sweat glands (why do you think they have saunas in health clubs and gyms?). Sweating, of course, is less than comfortable when you are wearing nice clothes or just any clothes that reveal obvious sweat-marks. Perhaps we need to take a page from the rest of the world and just, well, be sweaty and okay with it as a natural thing our bodies need to do. But, in our American society, this just isn’t okay, because although we may be able to overlook your embarrassingly sweaty pits in a meeting, we will not forgive you for bringing your stanky funk with you.

So, what’s wrong with anti-perspirant? Aside from not letting your body eliminate toxins from your underarm sweat glands? 1. These products can make you just sweat more in other parts of your body…this happens to me. So while my pits might be lovely and dry, my whole back will be drenched to compensate for it…this is even worse than sweaty pits in my experience, especially when you go sit in the air conditioning afterwards…freezing!  Since it isn’t summer, this may be less of a concern, but keep it in mind when summer rolls around again. 2. Not sweating causes toxins to accumulate in your body and this has been associated with cancer of the lymph system and possibly breast cancer.  Enough said.  3. Aluminum is one of the main ingredients people want to avoid, but alas, this is the key ingredient for keeping the sweat glands in check. There is already a lot of aluminum in the world, but applying it directly to one of the most absorbent areas of the body gives one pause when you consider that an increased risk of Alzheimer’s has been associated with increased levels of aluminum in the body. Most anti-perspirants (even the “natural” crystal ones) use some form of aluminum salt to keep those sweat glands in check. Your cells literally swell from the aluminum salt application enough to close up the sweat glands. Depending on the strength of the anti-perspirant, you may only need to apply once a day.  However, the other problem I have with these products is my tender, sensitive skin begins to react to this application of salt in my underarms every day so that they hurt and feel…well…crusty. Even the pretty, made for a woman anti-perspirants do this to me. So…deodorants for me!

But wait. What’s wrong with deodorants? If any of you have been paying attention to my blog you can probably guess…it’s phthalates and other endocrine disruptors. And I thought I was being so clever and healthy. I replaced my Secret solid for some fancy Bath & Body or Victoria’s Secret body spray about five years ago. I rationalized that the alcohol would be killing the bacteria that are actually responsible for making sweaty pits into stinky pits, and then the fragrance would cover up anything that may develop throughout the day. Well, although that worked pretty well except for during the deepest Texas summer and trips to the gym, I was still applying harmful chemicals to my skin, half the time on freshly shaved skin, no less.

No doubt, some of you may have already tried the natural crystals. I suggest that you read your package ingredients and see if it contains an aluminum salt. If it does, I would also suggest looking for a different type. It just doesn’t seem worth the risk to use a product that may impact your brain function in later years, and since it runs in my family, I am absolutely concerned and will not use aluminum-based products if I can help it.

Some of you may have already tried Tom’s of Maine deodorant. I have tried three different scents over the years, and I don’t know if they have been tinkering with the formula or if the essential oil used for scent makes that much of a difference, BUT…the only kind that kept me from being stinky was the lavender version. This product is not powdery or silky, but rather on the sticky/goopy side. I have applied, then blotted before putting on clothes to keep the white-marks from getting everywhere. You must remember that Tom’s is only a deodorant and not an anti-perspirant, so you are still going to sweat. This brand is easy to find in most places you can buy personal products at about $5/tube.   Tom’s is also all-natural and never uses phthalates. You might want to give it a shot just to see if works with your body chemistry or well enough for you to be happy. I can live with it until I find a replacement that is better…and these are the ones I think I am going to try in the near future.

The gold standard seems to be La Vanila brand Healthy Deodorant. These babies cost $18/50g (1.7 oz) unless you buy a three-pack for $44 (that’s a $3.33 savings per tube). La Vanila swears by natural perfumery (they also have some apparently to die for fragrances/lotions/soaps) and science that exclude “petrochemicals, phthalates, propylene glycol, mineral oils, silicone, synthetic dyes, sulfates, or parabens” and additionally, since we are talking deodorant, they also have eliminated aluminum from the mix. You can buy these at Sephora and according to the reviews there, these are actually even acceptable for men to use (and they like it and don’t complain about smelling girly). If Santa Claus doesn’t bring me a gift card to Sephora, I might have to splurge and go get this anyway.

Options to consider. Honestly, you have decide for yourself on this. Do you care more about being sweaty or being stinky? If you care more about being sweaty, you are probably going to have to opt for some form of aluminum containing product. IF you choose this route, I suggest Lafe’s Natural and Organic Deodorant Spray. It uses potassium alum, which is a mineral salt containing, you guessed it, aluminum! It contains less per content than many other brands and works decently to keep you dry AND stink free. It only contains water, potassium alum, and aloe vera juice. I’m not sure about the plastic bottle it comes in, because it seems to have no recycle symbol on it, so that’s something of a question (I’ll contact them and see what they say about that). This brand is made right here in Austin, too, it seems, and you can get it on-line for about $6/4 oz. bottle, but I think I got my last bottle at the local fancy grocery store for about $4-something. On the up-side, it is unscented and therefore if you have found a natural perfume/body spray you like, it won’t clash with it at all, and you can share it with the men in your life without complaint. I confess that if need be, I might use this again during the high heat of the Texas summer if La Vanila or the recipe below can’t cut it.

Weleda spray deodorant was recommended by someone online, but a review of its ingredients (via drugstore.com) turned up benzyl benzoate, which is similar to phthalate in the fact that it is an endocrine disruptor. It’s even been used as an insecticide. However, when you go to the Weleda.com website, a different set of ingredients are listed and benzyl benzoate isn’t there. So, there could have been an update to the formula and drugstore.com hasn’t updated that info (or aren’t selling it yet). Read the label and if the benzyl benzoate is there, don’t buy it. This brand is also on the costly side…$13 from Weleda’s online store. It comes in Sage, Citrus, and Wild Rose fragrances. The company is natural certified six different ways to Sunday, so it seems ridiculous that they would put anything crappy in their formulas (like benzyl benzoate or phthalates), so in this instance, although it does not say “phthalate free” anywhere, I think we can assume it is. Or should be.

Now, for the real nitty-gritty hippy version. If you’ve done any sort of “greening up” your house, you’ve surely heard the praises of baking soda already. You can scrub with it like a scouring powder, you can brush your teeth with it, you can wash your hair with it, you can polish your silver, settle an upset stomach, get the stink out of your refrigerator, and, of course, make your baked goods rise. Now, too, you can keep your armpits from being smelly. You can dust it on like a powder using ½ c. baking soda mixed with ½ c. cornstarch. Or you can (and this is what I did) combine about 1 ½ cups of distilled or filtered water with ¼ c. baking soda. Mix well and pour it in a spray bottle. It’s that easy. AND it is ridiculously cheap at probably about $0.15 per batch. You might try adding some witch hazel, alcohol, aloe vera juice, or rosewater to improve your recipe. Witch hazel and alcohol will help kill the stink-causing bacteria, aloe vera will moisturize, and rosewater just smells good (but make sure it’s natural or make it yourself). Essential oils can be added with an alcohol mix, but without alcohol they won’t disperse properly. Spray this on your underarms after you get out of the shower and let it dry before putting on clothes. I’m trying this right now, and I’ll let you know how it goes. 

But I’m still gonna try La Vanila just because I want to.

Sweat on, dear friends, sweat on.

Categories: aluminum, deodorant, endocrine disruptors, phthalates | Tags: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

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